Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for the Treatment of Hypernasality: A Single Case Study Studies have investigated the applications of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy in the treatment of hypernasality due to velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD; Cahill et al., 2004; Kuehn, 1991; Kuehn, Moon, & Folkins, 1993; Kuehn et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of CPAP therapy ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2014
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for the Treatment of Hypernasality: A Single Case Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lakshmi Kollara
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Graham Schenck
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Jamie Perry
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Lakshmi Kollara

    Disclosure: Financial: Lakshmi Kollara, Graham Schenck, and Jamie Perry have no financial interests to disclose.

    Nonfinancial: Lakshmi Kollara, Graham Schenck, and Jamie Perry have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.

Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2014
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for the Treatment of Hypernasality: A Single Case Study
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2014, Vol. 24, 48-58. doi:10.1044/ssod24.2.48
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2014, Vol. 24, 48-58. doi:10.1044/ssod24.2.48

Studies have investigated the applications of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy in the treatment of hypernasality due to velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD; Cahill et al., 2004; Kuehn, 1991; Kuehn, Moon, & Folkins, 1993; Kuehn et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of CPAP therapy to reduce hypernasality in a female subject, post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) and pharyngeal flap, who presented with signs of VPD including persistent hypernasality. Improvements in mean velopharyngeal orifice size, subjective perception of hypernasality, and overall intelligibility were observed from the baseline to 8-week post-treatment assessment intervals. Additional long-term assessments completed at 2, 3, and 4 months post-treatment indicated decreases in immediate post-treatment improvements. Results from the present study suggest that CPAP is a safe, non-invasive, and relatively conservative treatment method for reduction of hypernasality in selected patients with TBI. More stringent long-term follow up may indicate the need for repeated CPAP treatment to maintain results.

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