Instrumental Assessment in Cleft Palate Care Despite advances in surgical management, it is estimated that 20–30% of children with repaired cleft palate will continue to have hypernasal speech and require a second surgery to create normal velopharyngeal function (Bricknell, McFadden, & Curran, 2002; Härtel, Karsten, & Gundlach, 1994; McWilliams, 1990). A qualitative perceptual assessment by a ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Instrumental Assessment in Cleft Palate Care
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jamie Perry
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Graham Schenck
    Doctoral Candidate, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders , East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Disclosure: Financial: Jamie Perry is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University. Graham Schenck is a doctoral candidate in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University.
    Disclosure: Financial: Jamie Perry is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University. Graham Schenck is a doctoral candidate in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University.×
    Nonfinancial: Jamie Perry has previously published work in this subject area. Some of this is referenced in this paper. Graham Schenck has no nonfinancial interests to disclose
    Nonfinancial: Jamie Perry has previously published work in this subject area. Some of this is referenced in this paper. Graham Schenck has no nonfinancial interests to disclose×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Instrumental Assessment in Cleft Palate Care
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 49-61. doi:10.1044/ssod23.2.49
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 49-61. doi:10.1044/ssod23.2.49

Despite advances in surgical management, it is estimated that 20–30% of children with repaired cleft palate will continue to have hypernasal speech and require a second surgery to create normal velopharyngeal function (Bricknell, McFadden, & Curran, 2002; Härtel, Karsten, & Gundlach, 1994; McWilliams, 1990). A qualitative perceptual assessment by a speech-language pathologist is considered the most important step of the evaluation for children with resonance disorders (Peterson-Falzone, Hardin-Jones, & Karnell, 2010). Direct and indirect instrumental analyses should be used to confirm or validate the perceptual evaluation of an experienced speech-language pathologist (Paal, Reulbach, Strobel-Schwarthoff, Nkenke, & Schuster, 2005).

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of current instrumental assessment methods used in cleft palate care. Both direct and indirect instrumental procedures will be reviewed with descriptions of the advantages and disadvantages of each. Lastly, new developments for evaluating velopharyngeal structures and function will be provided.

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