Editor's Column Hello and welcome to the October 2013 issue of Special Interest Group (SIG) 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. In this issue, we clearly focus on the “orofacial disorders” side of our SIG. We have what I think are three interesting and informative papers that address different ... Editorial
Editorial  |   October 01, 2013
Editor's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   October 01, 2013
Editor's Column
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 35. doi:10.1044/ssod23.2.35
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 35. doi:10.1044/ssod23.2.35
Hello and welcome to the October 2013 issue of Special Interest Group (SIG) 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. In this issue, we clearly focus on the “orofacial disorders” side of our SIG. We have what I think are three interesting and informative papers that address different dimensions of managing cleft and craniofacial disorders. The first paper comes from Drs. Gregg Lof, Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions and Dr. Denny Ruscello, Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at West Virginia University. The authors provide an excellent overview of the controversies associated with the use of blowing exercises for individuals with velopharyngeal inadequacy. So don't “blow it” and miss reading their paper. Dr. Jamie Perry, Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University and Mr. Graham Schenck, a doctoral candidate in Dr. Perry's lab, provide our second article in this issue. Their paper provides a nice overview of the range of instrumental procedures available for assessing resonance disorders. Our final contribution to this issue comes from Dr. Scott Dailey, who is a speech-language pathologist at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics and adjunct Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. Dr. Dailey provides a concise review of the relevant issues for managing feeding and swallowing problems in infants with cleft and craniofacial anomalies. All these articles provide a nice mix of basic and practical information for the reader. I hope you enjoy the issue.
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