Suck Predicts Neuromotor Integrity and Developmental Outcomes Neonatal motor behavior predicts both current neurological status and future neurodevelopmental outcomes. For speech pathologists, the earliest observable patterned oromotor behavior is suck. Suck production requires effective coordination of an infant's oral sensorimotor system and is subject to a variety of neuromodulatory inputs. Demonstration and practice of coordinated suck serves ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2009
Suck Predicts Neuromotor Integrity and Developmental Outcomes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meredith A. Poore
    Communication Neuroscience Laboratories and Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Steven M. Barlow
    Communication Neuroscience Laboratories, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, and Programs in Neuroscience, Human Biology, and Bioengineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Healthcare Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2009
Suck Predicts Neuromotor Integrity and Developmental Outcomes
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 44-51. doi:10.1044/ssod19.1.44
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 44-51. doi:10.1044/ssod19.1.44
Abstract

Neonatal motor behavior predicts both current neurological status and future neurodevelopmental outcomes. For speech pathologists, the earliest observable patterned oromotor behavior is suck. Suck production requires effective coordination of an infant's oral sensorimotor system and is subject to a variety of neuromodulatory inputs. Demonstration and practice of coordinated suck serves as a biomarker for oral feeding skills neural integrity and is being assessed for its relation to neurodevelopmental outcomes (speech, cognition, and learning) by research teams in the United States, Europe, Japan, and Brazil. Suck may also serve as an intervention point to prevent feeding disorders and mitigate speech-language delays and disorders.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant R01 DC003311 to Steven M. Barlow), the National Institutes of Health (Grants P30 HD02528 and P30 DC005803), and the Sutherland Foundation.
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