Orofacial Biomechanics and Speech Motor Control The mechanical properties (e.g., mass, stiffness, viscoelasticity) of bone, cartilage, muscle, tendon, ligament, fat, and skin among articulatory subsystems involved in speech and gesture collectively influence all aspects of movement and must be accounted for in the selection and sequencing of motor program elements. Damage or disease processes affecting peripheral ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2009
Orofacial Biomechanics and Speech Motor Control
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shin Ying Chu
    Communication Neuroscience Laboratories, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Steven M. Barlow
    Communication Neuroscience Laboratories, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, and Programs in Neuroscience, Human Biology, and Bioengineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2009
Orofacial Biomechanics and Speech Motor Control
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 37-43. doi:10.1044/ssod19.1.37
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 37-43. doi:10.1044/ssod19.1.37
Abstract

The mechanical properties (e.g., mass, stiffness, viscoelasticity) of bone, cartilage, muscle, tendon, ligament, fat, and skin among articulatory subsystems involved in speech and gesture collectively influence all aspects of movement and must be accounted for in the selection and sequencing of motor program elements. Damage or disease processes affecting peripheral or central nervous system function, or both, can affect muscle coordination and alter muscle stiffness. Therefore, the biomechanics of orofacial and vocal tract structures should be taken into account when considering the movement patterns and network signaling in the neuromotor control system in health and disease. The purpose of this report is to summarize our evolving approach to and application of orofacial biomechanics in the context of movement disorders associated with dysarthria and craniofacial anomalies. We describe a new application for mapping stiffness in the lips for clinical application in pediatric and adult populations.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant R01 DC003311 to Steven M. Barlow), the National Institutes of Health (Grant P30 HD02528, Grant P30 DC005803, and Grant R01 DE13814 to C. A. Trotman), and the Sutherland Foundation.
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