The Communication Neuroscience Laboratories at the University of Kansas: An Overview The Communication Neuroscience Laboratories (CNL) celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2009 with a brief overview of past and current research projects concerned with the sensorimotor development and control of orofacial and laryngeal systems subserving speech, vocalization, suck, oromotor, and aeroingestive behaviors in health and disease across the human life span. ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2009
The Communication Neuroscience Laboratories at the University of Kansas: An Overview
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven M. Barlow
    Communication Neuroscience Laboratories, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, and Programs in Neuroscience, Human Biology, and Bioengineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2009
The Communication Neuroscience Laboratories at the University of Kansas: An Overview
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 18-27. doi:10.1044/ssod19.1.18
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 18-27. doi:10.1044/ssod19.1.18
Abstract

The Communication Neuroscience Laboratories (CNL) celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2009 with a brief overview of past and current research projects concerned with the sensorimotor development and control of orofacial and laryngeal systems subserving speech, vocalization, suck, oromotor, and aeroingestive behaviors in health and disease across the human life span. A key ingredient in the multidimensional study lines described in this review is the assembly and nurturing of a strong multidisciplinary research team involving students and research faculty from communication sciences, biology, neuroscience, bioengineering, computer science, neurology, radiology and medical physics, neonatology, nursing, pediatrics, and physical therapy. The transfer of technology from bench to bedside (or even cribside) is another important function. An example of an innovation from the CNL is highlighted by a new therapeutic sensorimotor entrainment intervention (NTrainer) that helps premature infants with feeding disorders develop ororhythmic (suck) skills. When possible, project lines are directed toward patient-oriented research and innovative interventions aimed at driving mechanisms of brain plasticity to improve communication/ oromotor function, neurodevelopmental outcomes, or both.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant R01 DC003311 to Steven M. Barlow), the National Institutes of Health (Grant P30 HD02528, Grant P30 DC005803, and Grant R01 DE13814 to C. A. Trotman), and the Sutherland Foundation.
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