Tissue Engineering Applications for Cleft Palate Reconstruction Cleft palate is a common birth defect that carries significant biomedical and psychosocial implications throughout the lives of affected children and their families. To date, numerous etiopathogenetic factors have been identified that can lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft palate. The management of patients with cleft palate has ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2008
Tissue Engineering Applications for Cleft Palate Reconstruction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deepak M. Gupta, MD
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
  • Nicholas J. Panetta, MD
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
  • Michael T. Longaker, MD
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
  • H. Peter Lorenz, MD
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2008
Tissue Engineering Applications for Cleft Palate Reconstruction
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 73-86. doi:10.1044/ssod18.2.73
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 73-86. doi:10.1044/ssod18.2.73
Abstract

Cleft palate is a common birth defect that carries significant biomedical and psychosocial implications throughout the lives of affected children and their families. To date, numerous etiopathogenetic factors have been identified that can lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft palate. The management of patients with cleft palate has improved significantly over the last several decades with important surgical advances and an increasingly multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Technological innovations have become focused on improving functional results, with current research and clinical reports of cleft palate reconstruction promising even greater improvements and further “minimalization” of surgery in the future. As part of this evolution, research in tissue engineering approaches for cleft palate reconstruction promise increased functionality, improved aesthetics, fewer complications, and reduced disease burden. The current review discusses several aspects of tissue engineering research that promise innovation in cleft palate repair including distraction osteogenesis, biologic implants, fetal surgery, in utero medical therapy, and prevention.

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