Sensorimotor Elements of the Orofacial System: Reviewing the Basics The functional ability of the central nervous system (CNS) to transduce and process sensory information directly associated with voluntary action is believed to be an important element in sensorimotor learning and skill acquisition for the orofacial system. Muscles of the lower face insert directly into the facial skin, allowing for ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2008
Sensorimotor Elements of the Orofacial System: Reviewing the Basics
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard D. Andreatta
    Dept of Rehabilitation Sciences, Division of Communication Sciences & Disorders, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2008
Sensorimotor Elements of the Orofacial System: Reviewing the Basics
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 51-61. doi:10.1044/ssod18.2.51
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 51-61. doi:10.1044/ssod18.2.51
Abstract

The functional ability of the central nervous system (CNS) to transduce and process sensory information directly associated with voluntary action is believed to be an important element in sensorimotor learning and skill acquisition for the orofacial system. Muscles of the lower face insert directly into the facial skin, allowing for sensory endings to encode both the static and dynamic consequences of force and movement related to orofacial behavior. These task-related inputs are subsequently made available to sensorimotor cortices whose functions are known to be highly responsive to the consequences underlying precise adjustments in force during skilled motor control. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic review of the fundamental muscular and sensory elements contributing to orofacial sensorimotor control. In addition, select research on sensorimotor integration in the orofacial system will be summarized with a discussion on the importance of these findings in the context of orofacial rehabilitation.

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