Coordinator's Column In current training programs, how much time in a voice disorders course is devoted to articulation? Likewise, in current training programs, what percentage of an articulation/phonology course is devoted to resonance and resonance disorder? If these two questions puzzle you, you have a great deal of company among our ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   July 01, 2008
Coordinator's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   July 01, 2008
Coordinator's Column
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2008, Vol. 18, 2-4. doi:10.1044/ssod18.1.2
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2008, Vol. 18, 2-4. doi:10.1044/ssod18.1.2
In current training programs, how much time in a voice disorders course is devoted to articulation? Likewise, in current training programs, what percentage of an articulation/phonology course is devoted to resonance and resonance disorder?
If these two questions puzzle you, you have a great deal of company among our ASHA colleagues. These questions address our current dilemma in the manner in which new SLPs are being trained in the area of cleft palate care. Cleft palate is the structural anomaly most commonly associated with resonance disorder and, since “voice” and “resonance” are paired in the KASA guidelines, it follows that cleft palate is most likely to be addressed in a voice disorders class, if at all.
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