The Evolution of Methods for Imaging Vocal Fold Phonatory Function In this article, we provide a brief summary of the major technological advances that led to current methods for imaging vocal fold vibration during phonation including the development of indirect laryngoscopy, imaging of rapid motion, fiber optics, and digital image capture. We also provide a brief overview of new emerging ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2012
The Evolution of Methods for Imaging Vocal Fold Phonatory Function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
  • Disclosure: Daryush D. Mehta has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Daryush D. Mehta has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2012
The Evolution of Methods for Imaging Vocal Fold Phonatory Function
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2012, Vol. 22, 5-13. doi:10.1044/ssod22.1.5
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2012, Vol. 22, 5-13. doi:10.1044/ssod22.1.5

In this article, we provide a brief summary of the major technological advances that led to current methods for imaging vocal fold vibration during phonation including the development of indirect laryngoscopy, imaging of rapid motion, fiber optics, and digital image capture. We also provide a brief overview of new emerging technologies that could be used in the future for voice research and clinical voice assessment, including advances in laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, depth-kymography, and dynamic optical coherence tomography.

We would like to thank Steven M. Zeitels, MD, and Alessandro de Alarcoón, MD, for their critical review of historical research in laryngeal imaging (Zeitels & de Alarcoón, 2010) and to Dimitar D. Deliyski, PhD, for contributions to the state of the art in laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy (Deliyski & Hillman, 2010; Deliyski et al., 2008). We thank James B. Kobler, PhD, for providing the illustration in Figure 2. This paper draws from their publications and is based on a portion of the Willard R. Zemlin Memorial Lecture in Speech Science presented by the senior author (R.E. Hillman) at the 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in San Diego, CA.
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.