Editor's Column Hello and welcome to the July 2012 issue of Special Interest Group (SIG) 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. In this issue, we have two papers that, at first glance, are quite different. However, both share a common theme. Our first invited paper is written by Drs. ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 01, 2012
Editor's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   July 01, 2012
Editor's Column
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2012, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/ssod22.1.4
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2012, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/ssod22.1.4
Hello and welcome to the July 2012 issue of Special Interest Group (SIG) 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. In this issue, we have two papers that, at first glance, are quite different. However, both share a common theme.
Our first invited paper is written by Drs. Daryush Mehta and Robert Hillman, who both hold various appointments at Massachusetts General Hospital, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard University. Those of you who attended last fall's ASHA Convention already know that Dr. Hillman gave SIG 5's 2011 Zemlin Memorial lecture. We had a full house in San Diego as Dr. Hillman traced the long history of instrumental voice assessment and gave us a glimpse of the cutting edge techniques that experts are developing in the MGH lab and others. I am sure those who attended would agree that it was a fascinating talk, and I was thrilled when Drs. Mehta and Hillman agreed to contribute a piece for Perspectives on the past, present, and future of laryngeal imaging. Laryngeal imaging is an area that clearly highlights the important relationship between basic science and clinical practice. Experts could not have achieved forward progress in this area without some basic developments in science and technology. Instruments and imaging techniques that were once research tools relegated to the laboratory will become essential clinical examination tools tomorrow. Mehta and Hillman describe the evolution of laryngeal imaging, I am looking forward to a future where current research techniques like depth-kymography and dynamic optical coherence tomography are part of routine client care.
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