Editor's Column Hello and welcome to the October 2011 issue of Special Interest Group 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. In this issue, we focus on speech and voice acoustics. The acoustic signal holds special significance for speech communication. I think it is the key link in the complex ... Editorial
Editorial  |   October 2011
Editor's Column
Author Notes
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   October 2011
Editor's Column
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2011, Vol. 21, 30. doi:10.1044/ssod21.2.30
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2011, Vol. 21, 30. doi:10.1044/ssod21.2.30
Hello and welcome to the October 2011 issue of Special Interest Group 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. In this issue, we focus on speech and voice acoustics. The acoustic signal holds special significance for speech communication. I think it is the key link in the complex chain of biophysical events that connect a speaker and listener. The speaker is faced with the task of packaging all the necessary linguistic (and extra-linguistic) information into a time and frequency varying sound sequence. The listener, on the other hand, must quickly and accurately unpack the intended information from the very same sound sequence, if he/she is to understand what was just uttered. Furthermore, both speaker and listener must be able to adapt their production and perception processes to the wide range of acoustically “messy” environments in which we routinely communicate. This commonplace human activity never ceases to amaze me. This fact, that the acoustic signal is linked closely to both speech production and perception processes, has relevance for how we consider disorders of speech and voice. As clinicians, we typically rely on our perceptual judgments to make inferences about constraints and limitations on the production abilities of our clients. While we routinely use a variety of other information to assist with our clinical decision-making, we ultimately use our ears to judge the success or failure of intervention. The acoustic signal is particularly well-suited to help us, as clinicians, “connect the dots” in the chain between our clients’ production limitations and the resulting perceptual deviancies that serve to marginalize them within our communication community. Combining this with the facts that the acoustic signal can be easily acquired with relatively inexpensive equipment and analyzed with low-cost or freely available analysis software, I would argue that the routine acoustic analysis of disordered speech and voice is nearing or has reached the status of “ready for primetime.”
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access