Editor's Column Hello and welcome to the July 2011 issue of Special Interest Group 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. I am both excited and nervous to take over as Editor of Perspectives. Richard Andreatta is a hard act to follow. He did an outstanding job over the past ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 01, 2011
Editor's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   July 01, 2011
Editor's Column
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2011, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/ssod21.1.4
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2011, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/ssod21.1.4
Hello and welcome to the July 2011 issue of Special Interest Group 5's Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders. I am both excited and nervous to take over as Editor of Perspectives. Richard Andreatta is a hard act to follow. He did an outstanding job over the past 3 years, and I want to thank him for his support as I transition into this position. I am also grateful to the Coordinating Committee for giving me this opportunity to serve the Special Interest Group.
Our first invited paper was written by Dr. Christy Ludlow of James Madison University in Virginia. Many of you know that Dr. Ludlow gave the 2010 Zemlin Memorial Lecture last November at the annual ASHA Convention in Philadelphia. For those of you who did not attend Convention, were unable to get into the packed room for the lecture, or attended the lecture and are eager to get more information, this is your opportunity. Dr. Ludlow is a leading authority in the area of communication neurosciences. In this piece, Dr. Ludlow provides an overview of our current understanding of the neural basis of speech and voice production, drawing upon the most up-to-date work from her lab and others. Many speech, language, and hearing professionals have a keen interest in communication neurosciences, but sometimes wonder how, or if, this information will influence the clinical care we provide to our clients. Dr. Ludlow's article helps make that link between basic and clinical science. Examples include the use of modern neuroimaging techniques to evaluate treatment-related changes in neural function and the complementary use of traditional behavioral intervention and various forms of direct neural stimulation to enhance functional communication gains. I believe you will find that Dr. Ludlow envisions an exciting future for our field.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.