Integrating Science into Clinical Practice The integration of science into the clinical aspects of our field brings practitioners the ability to achieve accountability through empirical testing. The complete integration of science into clinical practice nonetheless is difficult, one reason being financial. Many medical institutions resist the development of scientific laboratories used for the clinical care ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Integrating Science into Clinical Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine Sapienza
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida-Gainesville
  • Elaine T. Stathopoulos
    Department of Communication Disorders, State University of New York-Buffalo
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Integrating Science into Clinical Practice
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 1998, Vol. 8, 6-7. doi:10.1044/ssod8.1.6
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 1998, Vol. 8, 6-7. doi:10.1044/ssod8.1.6
The integration of science into the clinical aspects of our field brings practitioners the ability to achieve accountability through empirical testing. The complete integration of science into clinical practice nonetheless is difficult, one reason being financial. Many medical institutions resist the development of scientific laboratories used for the clinical care of patients; it is often not viewed as cost-effective.
The second reason complete integration may not occur is because of the conceptual gap that exists between those who practice and those who “conduct science.” We are reminded of this gap by conversations that take place between practitioners and scientists at state and national meetings and conversations that take place over the ASHA special interest division listservs. The listserv discussions are of interest since they exemplify the discontinuity that exists between theory and practice. One area that seems to require attention is the role of the respiratory system during speech and voice production. In particular, the Division 3 (Voice and Voice Disorders) Listserv conversations among practitioners and scientists alike have shown misconceptions and lack of basic knowledge of respiratory physiology when considering the role of the respiratory system in the treatment of voice. It is apparent from these recent discussions that practitioners are using breathing techniques with less than sound empirical evidence to support the use of their methods. It is also evident from these discussions that argument exists about the function of the respiratory system during many types of voice disorders that are seemingly localized to the vocal folds.
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