Speech-Language Pathology Services for Individuals With Cleft Lip/Palate in Less Developed Nations: The Operation Smile Approach A number of organizations worldwide travel to nations with less-developed health care to provide services to individuals with cleft lip/palate and other craniofacial disorders. Some of these groups assign speech-language pathologists to their teams in adherence to a multidisciplinary approach that recognizes comprehensive needs of persons served, including speech, ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Speech-Language Pathology Services for Individuals With Cleft Lip/Palate in Less Developed Nations: The Operation Smile Approach
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte A. Ducote
    Division of Communicative Disorders, Ochsner Medical Institutions, New Orleans, LA
    The Speech Pathology Council, Operation Smile, Norfolk, Virginia
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Speech-Language Pathology Services for Individuals With Cleft Lip/Palate in Less Developed Nations: The Operation Smile Approach
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 1998, Vol. 8, 12-14. doi:10.1044/ssod8.1.12
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 1998, Vol. 8, 12-14. doi:10.1044/ssod8.1.12
A number of organizations worldwide travel to nations with less-developed health care to provide services to individuals with cleft lip/palate and other craniofacial disorders. Some of these groups assign speech-language pathologists to their teams in adherence to a multidisciplinary approach that recognizes comprehensive needs of persons served, including speech, medical, surgical, and/or dental aspects of care (American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association [ACPA], 1993). The need to address speech-language evaluation and intervention is essential, given the frequent occurrence of communication problems in the orofacial cleft/craniofacial population and the obvious adverse impact that these disorders can have on social, educational, and vocational opportunities. These impairments “can exclude an individual from the mainstream of society” in many cultures, thus “any assistance that could be provided for such a person to improve his/her ability to communicate would benefit the quality of the individual’s life” (D’Antonio & Landis, 1994). In many places, in-country speech-language pathologists are often not available at all or can only see a few people in limited locations. The purpose of this article is to review the philosophy of interdisciplinary care fostered by Operation Smile.
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