Book Review: Kudos and Cautions: A Review of The Clinician's Guide to Treating Cleft Palate Speech In the interest of full and honest disclosure, we (both products of Pittsburgh, PA-based mentors and practice strategies), hereby declare our biases at the outset of this review: Bias #1: We believe that cleft palate and craniofacial disorders are best managed by competent, multidisciplinary cleft palate teams that ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   October 01, 2007
Book Review: Kudos and Cautions: A Review of The Clinician's Guide to Treating Cleft Palate Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen R. Cohn
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Matthew D. Ford
    Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   October 01, 2007
Book Review: Kudos and Cautions: A Review of The Clinician's Guide to Treating Cleft Palate Speech
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 21-22. doi:10.1044/ssod17.2.21
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 21-22. doi:10.1044/ssod17.2.21
In the interest of full and honest disclosure, we (both products of Pittsburgh, PA-based mentors and practice strategies), hereby declare our biases at the outset of this review:
  • Bias #1: We believe that cleft palate and craniofacial disorders are best managed by competent, multidisciplinary cleft palate teams that work in concert with community-based speech-language pathologists.

  • Bias #2: We agree wholeheartedly with the authors’ statement: “In our collective experience, patients who exhibit consistent, pervasive hypernasal resonance do not respond to behavioral therapy, and are more appropriately treated through physical means” (Preface, v.).

  • Bias #3: We are great fans of the Mosby text Cleft Palate Speech (2001)—also by Sally J. Peterson-Falzone, Mary A. Hardin-Jones, and Michael P. Karnell—and have assigned it to our graduate classes in cleft palate.

  • Bias #4: We know and like the authors. They are our valued colleagues, and we enjoy any opportunity to learn from them at ASHA and ACPA meetings!

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