Part 2. Cleft Lip and Palate in the Developing World: Speech-Language Pathology Service Delivery Models The following paper is the second of a two-part series focusing on speech issues related to cleft lip and palate in developing countries. Part 1 of this paper appeared in the July issue of Perspectives and spotlighted the speech outcomes of individuals with cleft lip and palate in the developing ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Part 2. Cleft Lip and Palate in the Developing World: Speech-Language Pathology Service Delivery Models
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Debbie Sell
    Speech and Language Therapy Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital Trust for Children
    Institute of Child Health, University of LondonLondon, United Kingdom
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Part 2. Cleft Lip and Palate in the Developing World: Speech-Language Pathology Service Delivery Models
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 16-20. doi:10.1044/ssod17.2.16
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 16-20. doi:10.1044/ssod17.2.16
The following paper is the second of a two-part series focusing on speech issues related to cleft lip and palate in developing countries. Part 1 of this paper appeared in the July issue of Perspectives and spotlighted the speech outcomes of individuals with cleft lip and palate in the developing world, a population that is often beyond the age when speech is acquired at the time of surgery (Wilcox, 1994).
Beyond client-centered issues relating to speech production as discussed in Part 1, there are broader issues to consider when providing speech-language pathology services in the developing world. Families in developing countries often have minimal knowledge of treatment-related issues and logistics for care, including the consequences of clefting conditions (Prathanee, Dechongkit, & Manochiopinig, 2006; Schwarz & Bhai-Khadka, 2004), the need for early surgical intervention, pathway of care, availability of educational material, and limited peer support groups. Based upon their experience with families in Sri Lanka, Wickenden, Hartley, Kodikara, Mars, et al. (2001)  stated that “families are likely to expect a cure, or attempted cure through medical intervention, relatively little individual attention, not much information or choice about the management of the problem and a one-off visit, not an ongoing service” (p. 317). The latter comment is particularly pertinent given the necessity for the long-term nature of care for individuals with cleft palate.
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