Cleft Palate and Speech: Three Models of Focused Education In the early years of the discipline of communication sciences and disorders, it was common for academic programs to offer courses referred to generally as “Organics,” which typically consisted of a compilation of voice disorders, cleft lip/palate and related craniofacial anomalies, and perhaps other anatomically and physiologically based communication ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2006
Cleft Palate and Speech: Three Models of Focused Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David P. Kuehn
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL
  • Ann W. Kummer
    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Linda L. D'Antonio
    Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
  • Michael P. Karnell
    University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2006
Cleft Palate and Speech: Three Models of Focused Education
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2006, Vol. 16, 17-21. doi:10.1044/ssod16.2.17
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2006, Vol. 16, 17-21. doi:10.1044/ssod16.2.17
In the early years of the discipline of communication sciences and disorders, it was common for academic programs to offer courses referred to generally as “Organics,” which typically consisted of a compilation of voice disorders, cleft lip/palate and related craniofacial anomalies, and perhaps other anatomically and physiologically based communication disorders as well. As the scientific and clinical knowledge base increased, many programs divided such courses into more homogeneous topic areas, for example, establishing a separate course devoted exclusively to cleft lip/palate and related craniofacial anomalies. However, with the expanding scope of practice in the discipline and the need to cover these more diverse areas of practice at the master’s level, many academic programs have reverted to combining disorder areas once again into more encompassing courses. As a result, a variety of disorder areas are introduced to students but at the expense of less depth of coverage of the individual areas.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.