Applying Evidence-Based Practice to Bottle Feeding Babies With Cleft Palate In the preceding issue of Perspectives, Orange and Johnson (2006)  and Reilly (2006)  described the development of evidence-based practice (EBP) and its importance to speech pathology. They argue convincingly the importance for all speech-language pathologists to become evidence-based practitioners and outlined processes (and the perceived barriers) for doing so. ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2006
Applying Evidence-Based Practice to Bottle Feeding Babies With Cleft Palate
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie Reid
    Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2006
Applying Evidence-Based Practice to Bottle Feeding Babies With Cleft Palate
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2006, Vol. 16, 11-16. doi:10.1044/ssod16.2.11
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2006, Vol. 16, 11-16. doi:10.1044/ssod16.2.11
In the preceding issue of Perspectives, Orange and Johnson (2006)  and Reilly (2006)  described the development of evidence-based practice (EBP) and its importance to speech pathology. They argue convincingly the importance for all speech-language pathologists to become evidence-based practitioners and outlined processes (and the perceived barriers) for doing so.
Over the past few years, several specialities in speech-language pathology have adopted the principles and practice of EBP from which guidelines for practice have been developed. The trend appears to be less evident in the area of cleft palate, particularly for diagnoses and interventions. The possible reasons for this may lie in the fact that while information about particular speech pathology diagnostic procedures and interventions used to manage cleft palate exists, the evidence for their use is not always readily available (Reilly, 2006). Furthermore, when evidence can be found, clinicians may have difficulty accessing it. Some of the commonly cited barriers are lack of time to search for evidence, lack of resources such as access to electronic databases and full text articles, and lack of skills in searching and evaluating the literature (Brener, Vallino-Napoli, Reid, & Reilly, 2003). These barriers are shared by other professions and have implications for how clinicians are taught and use EBP (Fineout-Overholt, Hofstetter, Shell, & Johnston, 2005; Orange & Johnson, 2006) to manage patients with cleft disorders.
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