Maximizing Clinical Acquisition and Interpretation of Aerodynamic and Acoustic Speech Data in Children With Velopharyngeal Dysfunction Although the ear is the most important diagnostic “tool” of speech-language pathologists, it is also recognized that instrumentation provides essential supplemental information. Indeed, relative to velopharyngeal (VP) function, Peterson-Falzone, Hardin-Jones, and Karnell (2001)  state that a comprehensive evaluation must include both perceptual and instrumental procedures. The use of instrumentation ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Maximizing Clinical Acquisition and Interpretation of Aerodynamic and Acoustic Speech Data in Children With Velopharyngeal Dysfunction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Zajac
    Craniofacial Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Maximizing Clinical Acquisition and Interpretation of Aerodynamic and Acoustic Speech Data in Children With Velopharyngeal Dysfunction
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2005, Vol. 15, 11-14. doi:10.1044/ssod15.2.11
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, October 2005, Vol. 15, 11-14. doi:10.1044/ssod15.2.11
Although the ear is the most important diagnostic “tool” of speech-language pathologists, it is also recognized that instrumentation provides essential supplemental information. Indeed, relative to velopharyngeal (VP) function, Peterson-Falzone, Hardin-Jones, and Karnell (2001)  state that a comprehensive evaluation must include both perceptual and instrumental procedures. The use of instrumentation with the craniofacial population is important for objective documentation of dysfunction and to assist in management planning. In some cases, instrumentation also may be used as a biofeedback technique. Given that children with VP dysfunction often present with multiple perceptual symptoms involving phonation, resonance, and/or articulation, instrumentation may especially help speech-language pathologists to identify and/or prioritize treatment goals. The purpose of this article is to describe modifications to two non-invasive instrumental techniques to maximize the evaluation of VP function in young children.
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