Implementing Treatment Recommendations: Role of the Craniofacial Team Speech-Language Pathologist in Working With the Client's Speech-Language Pathologist Because cleft palate and other craniofacial disorders are of relatively low incidence in the general population, many cleft palate and/or craniofacial disorders teams are managing the care of children from large geographic regions, rather than well-defined local areas. Consequently, most of the children followed by a team receive only ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Implementing Treatment Recommendations: Role of the Craniofacial Team Speech-Language Pathologist in Working With the Client's Speech-Language Pathologist
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn Marty Grames
    Department of Speech Pathology, St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Implementing Treatment Recommendations: Role of the Craniofacial Team Speech-Language Pathologist in Working With the Client's Speech-Language Pathologist
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 6-9. doi:10.1044/ssod14.2.6
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 6-9. doi:10.1044/ssod14.2.6
Because cleft palate and other craniofacial disorders are of relatively low incidence in the general population, many cleft palate and/or craniofacial disorders teams are managing the care of children from large geographic regions, rather than well-defined local areas. Consequently, most of the children followed by a team receive only tertiary care from the team medical center. Primary and secondary care takes place much closer to the child’s home, and often, the primary and secondary care providers have limited experience or prior coursework with cleft palate or craniofacial deformity.
The consequence of these circumstances is that the speech-language pathologist working on a cleft palate and craniofacial team must communicate and collaborate with the community speech-language pathologist to optimize service to the cleft-affected child with a communication disorder. As members of multispeciality teams, we hold our collaboration with other health care professionals in high regard, but we may experience frustration when it comes to collaboration with other members of our own profession.
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