The Role of Speech and Hearing Sciences in a Clinical World I was asked to address the topic of “future directions for preservice and inservice education in the speech and hearing sciences.” I was flattered by the invitation and by the thought that anyone might believe I had something to offer about our future. I will attempt to offer some ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
The Role of Speech and Hearing Sciences in a Clinical World
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kim A. Wilcox
    College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
The Role of Speech and Hearing Sciences in a Clinical World
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 3-5. doi:10.1044/ssod14.2.3
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 3-5. doi:10.1044/ssod14.2.3
I was asked to address the topic of “future directions for preservice and inservice education in the speech and hearing sciences.” I was flattered by the invitation and by the thought that anyone might believe I had something to offer about our future. I will attempt to offer some observations which, I hope, will be useful; but before I do, I would like to reflect on the wording of the topic itself.
Few other academic disciplines would phrase the opportunity as we do, with an emphasis on preser-vice and inservice education. That’s because most other disciplines don’t see themselves as inextricably tied to a profession, or professions, as we do. Instead, the primary (and oftentimes only) influence on curricula is the perceived needs of the future of the discipline. Even faculty in psychology, home to a clinical doctorate, does not talk of preservice and inservice course-work when discussing their basic curricula—and certainly not at the undergraduate level. That’s not to say that some psychology faculty aren’t actively engaged in preser-vice and inservice issues, but those issues are not the defining themes for the basic curriculum. Instead, preservice and inservice are addressed in the context of an assumed strength of core curriculum, which, in turn, is determined by the current scientific state, and the perceived needs of the field.
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