Treatment of Sound System Disorders Associated with Cleft Palate Speech Following several principles can simplify treatment of the sound system disorders that occur in children with cleft palate. The first step is to sort out the specific errors produced and classify them as developmental, obligatory, adaptive, or compensatory. Then, understand which errors can be corrected in speech therapy and ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Treatment of Sound System Disorders Associated with Cleft Palate Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Golding-Kushner
    Private Practice and Velo-cardio-facial Syndrome Educational Foundation, Inc., Milltown, NJ 08850
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Treatment of Sound System Disorders Associated with Cleft Palate Speech
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 16-20. doi:10.1044/ssod14.2.16
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 16-20. doi:10.1044/ssod14.2.16
Following several principles can simplify treatment of the sound system disorders that occur in children with cleft palate. The first step is to sort out the specific errors produced and classify them as developmental, obligatory, adaptive, or compensatory. Then, understand which errors can be corrected in speech therapy and which cannot. Use appropriate procedures and follow a logical hierarchy to teach new sounds and to guide mastery of production from syllables to conversation. Following are some key questions and discussion.
What types of sound production errors cannot be treated in speech therapy? Obligatory errors — those that are a direct result of a structural or physiological abnormality—cannot be corrected therapeutically. Examples of obligatory errors include passive nasal emission (escape) and reduced intraoral pressure in the presence of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and anterior distortion of sibilants in the presence of a severe Class III malocclusion or multiple anterior endentulous spaces. By definition, obligatory errors spontaneously resolve following correction of the underlying physical anomaly.
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