A Model for Integrating the Speech and Hearing Sciences Into Clinical Practice: Everything Old Is New Again Combining the artistry of being an effective therapist with the science of understanding why therapy is needed is a challenging task. To ensure continual improvement of clinical services provided to patients, it is important to evaluate the assessments and treatments being provided to determine when it is timely to ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2004
A Model for Integrating the Speech and Hearing Sciences Into Clinical Practice: Everything Old Is New Again
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen Treole Cox
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2004
A Model for Integrating the Speech and Hearing Sciences Into Clinical Practice: Everything Old Is New Again
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2004, Vol. 14, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ssod14.1.3
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, July 2004, Vol. 14, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ssod14.1.3
Combining the artistry of being an effective therapist with the science of understanding why therapy is needed is a challenging task. To ensure continual improvement of clinical services provided to patients, it is important to evaluate the assessments and treatments being provided to determine when it is timely to change them. Clinicians may casually refer to providing “state of the art” clinical services. To many, this implies providing the newest and most technologically advanced treatments—using a new computer program or applying a “recently invented” clinical technique, for example. Many clinicians will also casually report that they are not “scientists” and they have no true interest in research. Oftentimes, clinicians may report feeling competent in providing treatment services, but do not feel comfortable speaking in realms of the anatomy and physiology of a disorder. For example, clinicians may not feel comfortable discussing the neurological ramifications of a deficit, yet they know which treatment exercises to employ to improve that neurological deficit. The integration of the speech and hearing sciences into clinical practice is crucial in providing the most efficient and effective treatments for patients in any domain and is particularly important for patients with craniofacial anomalies.
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