Special Interest Division 5 Draft Statement on Hypernasality Labeling a speech disorder should accurately reflect the anatomical nature of the disorder and avoid erroneous or ambiguous connotations. Hypernasality is the disturbance of oral-nasal resonance caused by inappropriate and incomplete closure of the velopharyngeal valving mechanism. Although resonance disorders have been traditionally classified as voice disorders, hypernasality ... SIG News
SIG News  |   December 01, 1997
Special Interest Division 5 Draft Statement on Hypernasality
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SIG News
SIG News   |   December 01, 1997
Special Interest Division 5 Draft Statement on Hypernasality
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 1997, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/ssod7.1.3
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 1997, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/ssod7.1.3
Labeling a speech disorder should accurately reflect the anatomical nature of the disorder and avoid erroneous or ambiguous connotations. Hypernasality is the disturbance of oral-nasal resonance caused by inappropriate and incomplete closure of the velopharyngeal valving mechanism. Although resonance disorders have been traditionally classified as voice disorders, hypernasality is not a disturbance of the voice producing mechanism. Hypernasality should be distinguished from hoarseness, which is caused by dysfunction of the laryngeal mechanism. Hyper-nasality and hoarseness represent dysfunction of different anatomic components of the speech production mechanism and warrant individual labels.
Hypernasality and velopharyngeal dysfunction may have structural, neurological, or behavioral etiologies. Evaluation and management of velopharyngeal dysfunction requires special training. Plastic and Craniofacial Surgeons (Oral Surgeons and Otolaryngologists), Maxillofacial Prosthodontists, and Speech-Language Pathologists are the specialists qualified and licensed to evaluate and treat/render service to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be most appropriately evaluated and managed in the interdisciplinary setting of a cleft pal-ate/craniofacial team or by specialists with comparable knowledge of speech and the velopharyngeal mechanism who have obtained special training and skills.
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