Lateral Cephalometric Assessment of Velopharyngeal Structures Note: This tutorial describes the procedure for taking lateral still radiographs of the velopharyngeal mechanism and analyzing the structures using cephalometric analysis techniques. The author describes a procedure for collecting the radiographs using hard copies from the fluoroscopic radiology suite. Lateral cephalometric radiographs can also be obtained from the lateral ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1997
Lateral Cephalometric Assessment of Velopharyngeal Structures
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John C. Pennington
    Mountain Region Speech and Hearing Center, Kingsport, TN
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 1997
Lateral Cephalometric Assessment of Velopharyngeal Structures
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 1997, Vol. 7, 24-29. doi:10.1044/ssod7.1.24
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, December 1997, Vol. 7, 24-29. doi:10.1044/ssod7.1.24
Note: This tutorial describes the procedure for taking lateral still radiographs of the velopharyngeal mechanism and analyzing the structures using cephalometric analysis techniques. The author describes a procedure for collecting the radiographs using hard copies from the fluoroscopic radiology suite. Lateral cephalometric radiographs can also be obtained from the lateral cephalometric radiographs taken by orthodontists. The Subtelny norms referred to in this presentation were collected in this manner. Lateral cephalometric radiographs taken by standard orthodontic technique are generally life-size and do not have the distortion of radiographs taken in the radiology suite.
Understanding the nature of an individual’s velopharyngeal mechanism is essential to effective treatment. The procedures for assessing velopharyngeal function can vary from typical perceptual assessments such as listener judgment of nasality, specific articulation testing, and direct oral examination to more sophisticated measures such as aerodynamic studies, nasometry nasoendoscopy, and radiography (still cephalometric x-rays and videofluoroscopy.) Each of these measures allows a unique evaluation of the velopharyngeal mechanism and each has advantages and disadvantages. Further, the clinical setting and knowledge base of the practitioners often determine the procedures available to an individual.
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